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capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and others. the systems have become a force multiplier for military operations and for border security. however, we run the edge of the new horizon. using unmanned aerial systems within the homeland currently are 200 active certificates of operation issue i the federal aviation administration to over 100 different entities such as law enforcement department and academic institutions to fly drugs domestically. this map on the monitor shows the locations of coa recipients as at april 2012. the number of recipients since that time has in fact increased. the faa plans to select 65 cities around the country for the use of nongovernment euros this year and plans to
we used to say faculty took 80% to. and 200 years ago it makes them in the effective. it is to start on the aspect of the college and university the way academic programs are delivered. you will say a much greater savings. . . for thi hearing. see no objection, mr. duncan, yet no objection to that? i now recognize myself for an opening statement. unmanned aerial systems commonly known as drone has been a game changer for men and women serving in iraq and afghanistan. the systems have provided troops with eyes in the skies have taken the flight to the enemy. to eliminate the most dangerous al qaeda terrorist, drums have increased capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and
at the use of domestic drums. republican senator tom coburn on the anti-tax pledge signed by many gop members of congress. >> it was about those men and women who are almost mortally injured and more. who because of the huge advances that have been made and medical trauma treatment over the last 10 years, now they are being saved. an incredible number of being saved. almost everybody who follows on the battlefield is being saved. i wanted to write about what life was like for these people. i started out with the question having seen some people who were pretty, pretty gruesomely maimed , wouldn't it be better off if they were dead? .we wish that they were dead? >> the senate education committee heard from college presidents today about ways to control tuition costs. educators are michigan, iowa, indiana and florida testified from us two hours. >> senate committee on health education committee and labour pensions will come to order. as we approach the start of the academic year, many students and families are struggling to pay the estimated cost of college. during the difficult economic times,
, in some ways, it is not a problem. the ambush protected vehicle that they use in iraq and afghanistan, it was something that the hill prioritize because people were getting blown up by ied's. there is a proper role for congress exercising decision-making and imposing some things on executive office and institutions. how to deal with the rest? management, either. there is not a golden bullet that is going to resolve this problem permanently. something that someone will have to wrestle with on a case-by-case basis. at least my opinion is going to be that you have to hope that the governors i have already outlined are sufficient. but most of those things don't come into the budget. >> we should probably clarify that, you know, when people present in arguments, pros and cons, the majority responds favorably to both. so it is not that most people are carrying around a very discrete human of i think defense should be cut and i am looking for signs that this candidate is for organs that. it is not that articulated. it is more because they say oh, yeah, that's true, oh, okay, now have to make
, settled within 20 miles of either the ohio or the lower mississippi river. they were used to farming in heavily wooded areas. and to them for me was a formula should be cut down trees and pull out hundreds of stumps before you did. the idea of going out into the vast grasslands and dropping about was something it was very difficult for them to get to my to read to the other problem of course they can find in southern illinois was they had no ability really get tired of to link it if you have done this after you cut down a forest, you know that the stumps after youtube land, at that point it was impossible to get clear title to incorporate these people were not just the they were basically squatters because the public lands had not been put on sold or were not put on sale until 1814. so other than a few people who held under agent grants, most of these before taking a risk and settling in a wilderness at that point. and ran the risk that therefore might at some point be bought out from under them by some better money speculative from the east. would enable the public lands to be surve
st reagan administration, taken a sizable advance, and there was something in her. she could not use --he first person singular pronoun was an enemy of jeanne's. she couldn't bring herself to do the sort of e mest veti, enge -- personal revelation into her million missouri and -- memoirs, and i talked too her trying to convince her, and she was like, i'd like too but i can't. ani sd,'lelp y doew a do a syllabus -- naive of me, work as an editor of your own life rather than a creator of your own life. so we went long like that for quite a number of conversations, andhell wna lyom hdo it, and after she died, i thought, this is the kind of promiseo keep. it's not as she herself said, a big life, but it's a very important life, and i did this book to keep her moryre >>os tt mp -- explains the title, boy r "the big little life." it's important to arabout the values shelash in the heartland. and she grew up in a socty where the values were very good, but whereir yom ot nessalyge get a four-year college degree or have a career. so if you could talk about her family background and the things
bragging that he could do it, but it was also a warning to us. what if the next time that happens it's a larger utility or a group of smaller utilities around the country, maybe water, maybe electricity, maybe gas, and this time they're not just warning us or showing us our vulnerability but they're actually going to disrupt the flow of electricity or water to people who depend on it. that's -- that's the kind of crisis that we face and why it is so urgent that we deal with this. so let me come back to my dream. my goal here is that as we go on this week, we're able to submit a manager's amendment, but it's not just from the managers, senators collins, rockefeller, feinstein and i. we're joined by a much broader group and we form a broad bipartisan consensus here to protect our country from a terrible danger that is real, urgent and growing. mr. president, i always like to -- i was thinking about it again in this case -- think back in these moments. since i don't see anybody else on the floor, i will undulling myself and go back to a hot july day in philadelphia -- indulge myself and
and everybody, the president, the secretary, everybody agrees that would be very devastating for u.s. national security and they want to avoid at all costs. >> thank you. that is helpful. rich, governor romney has said many, many times that he would not like to cut the defense budget, but at to the same time be inconsistent with lower taxes. within the framework of the problems that the country has to date with respect to the national deficit, et cetera, i don't know anybody who says you can't raise defense spending, cut taxes and accomplish anything with respect to the national debt. so how do you do that, sir? >> i should introduce you to more people. >> look, i heard the same thing in 1979 and in 1980. on the economy was crippled with double-digit inflation. >> you think is the same as in today? >> no, it's worse, but it can be done with the government's been clear about if he thinks we have to rebuild our navy. and he thinks obviously with the philosophical difference with president obama and governor reagan on the economy -- governor romney and president obama on the economy, it is one th
that rationally neutral black politicians have been using and talk about the consequences of the strategies for present day black politics. >> host: okay. so you'd say it's more than about obama, though? he's the central figure -- >> guest: yeah. it's a way lot more. i think history is very important to figuring out what's going on at the moment, and so not only it's about grounding the rise of obama, but within history i talk about the jesse jackson campaigns, chicago politics back in 1928 with the first blank -- black congressman coming from the southside of chicago. i talk about ideological fishers around liberation, theology, prosperity, gospel, and this long history about the politics of respectability. looking at -- the need of black elites to raise up what i describe as the untalented nine-tenths within the black community to present a positive face to america, white america, about racial progress. the rise of obama is within all of these contexts. to sort of explain the 2008 race and what obama did as a candidate, particularly when he faced issues of race, it has to be anchored in t
strategies that racially neutral black politics -- black politicians have been using, and talk about the consequences of those strategies for present-day black politics. >> host: you would say it's more than about obama, though. he is a stroll figure, kind of instigated -- >> guest: it's way, way a lot more. i think history is very important to sort of figuring out what's going on at the moment. and so not only it's about what a grounding the rise of obama within history, i talk about shirley chisolm, jesse jackson, chicago politics, starting way back in 1928. with the first black congressman from the south side of chicago, and i talk about these ideological fissures in black -- this long history about the politics of resuspectability, looking at the need of black elite to raise up what i would describe the untalented 9/10th s in the black community to put a positive face to white america about racial progress, and so the rise of obama is within all these contexts, and sort of explains the 2008 race and what obama did as a candidate, particularly when he faced issues of race. it has
's vital for us to help them. you know, when a young man or young woman who deserves to go to college doesn't because they can't afford it, they lose, their family loses, and our country loses as well. when a young person goes to the college they shouldn't really go to because they can't afford the college they deserve to go to and want to go to, they lose, their family loses, and america loses. and so it's been a passion of mine that we give the middle class, not just the poor but the middle class as well, help in paying for college because it is so expensive but it is so important. and so we have in law now something called the child -- the american opportunity tax credit. it's legislation i wrote. it helped 9.1 million 235e78s get a -- families get a tax break on their children's college tuition last year. because of the american opportunity tax credit, more parents and students now qualify for tax relief to pay for college expenses, not just for two years but for a whole four years of study. it gives a $2,500 tax credit right off your taxes to families whose income is up to $180,000 a y
's their response? >> they're working with us. [laughter] >> so it's a legitimate reason -- >> the current structure, mr. chairman, that the way the data's pulled in and then analyzed, it's, for example, 2012 we're looking at 2010 data. and so how does that become actionable and meaningful when you get your report, it's really just tied to an update in finances and not to clinical care. and we want it tied to clinical care so we can make actionable statements about patients. so that's the problem using claims data that then has to be aggregated when that year's closed out and analyzed. and by the time it's analyzed and presented, another year's passed. that's why we're looking at other data systems that get to the target you're asking us to get to, and if we had these other, access to these other data systems, they're realtime. they allow us to say that happened last month. that can't happen this month. we need to put an action plan in place to correct that. that's part of the big disconnect, and it's not for lack of trying. it's just the wrong data set to drive the goal that we're trying to reach.
how to use that information. to say that we have national coverage in really working with folks at that level is not true. but what we have are a set of programs with the mitigation center, with extension services on creating what we call drought-ready mounts whose major role is to be able to access and get guidance on the use of the information that we put on the web site. >> all right, thanks. .. i think that the program by would say is in its infancy of feral five or six years but already we have seen great gains in that regard and we talk about how can farmers access this information the weatherman for example in a state and agriculture states like oklahoma or rock stars, those other guys most people pay attention to when they watch the nightly news but now folks are starting to learn and farmers and producers on the ground are starting to learn they can access even more information related to drop through the drought portal which has been set up and through integration of noaa and scientists involved with land grant universities and that sort of thing, helping to get the wo
. for those of us who have had the pleasure and the honor of coming to know ryan well, this latest story is not at all surprising. it actually is quite in keeping with the character and actions of this superb, decent, selfless man, a man who i would call without question or hesitation the most excellent foreign service officer and one of the finest public servants i have ever known. for the past 41 years, ever since he was a junior diplomat serving in prerevolution iran, ryan crocker has consistently answered the call to serve in the most challenging, the most difficult but also the most important posts in the world. they were the places as it turned out where america needed ryan crocker the most, and he has always served with distinction. he was a young officer in lebanon when our embassy was bombed. ryan crocker helped to pull his colleagues from the rubble and then got back to work. he was one of the first civilians into afghanistan and iraq after the recent wars, helping to re-establish our diplomatic presence in both countries after decades. he returned to iraq during the surge, and
the standard of living for those on medicare and medicaid, rather than ask anything of the wealthiest among us. and by the way, i come from a wealthy state of delaware. i think has the highest per capita still. the wealthy in my state are as patriotic as caring as the poor. i have never seen any distinction between patriotism or generosity come from poor folk and the wealthy guy. but we are not asking anything of them. they are the only group in this entire recession we have not asked anything of. we launched two wars, one necessary, one not necessary. and on the way, the same time gave him multi-trillion dollars tax cut over the same period of time. i don't get it. and on top of maintaining the bush tax cut, and we want to maintain it for middle-class people, on top of that, and on top of what it will do to all the other benefits of seniors have, that they want to undo, the house republicans voted to repeal the health care law last week. let's not forget what that means. but they voted against. let me go back to taxes for just a second. there is the 800 billion that is set aside over here for
that is where you are no longer going to use it. now you could still use the argument and you hear that argument more often on the republican side which is just sort of let them all slaughter each other, and without a great consideration of the strategic calculations in the middle east because it's sort of like the middle east, just go away. so, i think that is also a pretty powerful again, i would emphasize -- emphasize if you had to write now put your finger on something that would change the dynamic here, that has to be turkey. turkey. i think, i think professor -- professor, president obama's out of this one unless you see something happen in turkey or if you just see the slaughter accelerate at such a rate that we are more or less obliged to do something. it's possible that if the fsa could get ahold of aleppo and declared a free city to set up an opposition government in aleppo and figure out some way how to stop the armor, the artillery and the planes from driving them out at least for a while, that you could rapidly change the dynamic. and it would certainly be, it would certainly be an
at the various campaign strategies that racially neutral lack politics and black politicians have been using and talks about the consequences of those strategies for present-day black politics. >> host: okay so you would say it's more than about obama though, the central theme, it's about a lot more? >> guest: it's way a lot more. i think history is very important to sort of figuring out what's going on at the moment and so not only is it about the grounding rise of obama within history. i talk about sort of shirley chisholm and jesse jackson campaigns and i talk about chicago politics starting way back in 1928 with the first black congressman coming from the south side chicago and i talk about the ideological fissures within the black communities around liberation theology, prosperity, gospel and this long history about the politics of respectability, looking at sort of the need of black communities to raise up what i would describe as the untalented 910th within the black community to present a positive face to america, to white america about racial progress and so the rise of obama is wit
is coming froms their agenda by virtue of us knowing where the money's coming from. so this legislation will stop the special treatment for the super pacs by making sure that they play by the rules that everybody else has to. mr. president, there's going to be a lot of commentary here tonight. i thank you for the opportunity, and i yield the floor. mr. merkley: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. let me, first of all, just thank senator whitehouse for heading up this campaign finance task force. i think this has been a real solid effort by a number of senators, and senator whitehouse, whether it's at netroots or here on the senate floor, has been participating this evening, and we really appreciate all of his help. the presiding officer, senator merkley, has also been a key member of the task force. senator bennet, who is going to be speaking after me, another member of the task force. and we so appreciate all of us getting together. and one of the things we need to be reminded of this evening is where we are. we just t
is the junior u.s. senator from ohio. he was elected in 2010 after lunging a campaign focused on conservative values and raining reigning in overzealous spending in washington. he represented the second district in the house for over a decade before serving in cabinet level post in the united states trade represent and directer of the office of management budget. he was one of three senate republicans amounted appointed too late committee on deficit reduction. born and raised in small business family, senator portman has been fighting for pro-growth, projobs policy, to help get ohio and our nation back on track. please help me in welcoming senator rob portman. [applause] eric thank you. good morning, everybody. >> good morning. >> good to have you in washington, d.c. we need you here. we ned your message. this is a group that understands that hard work and risk taking, and investment is what it's going to take to get the economy back on track. get your businesses back on track, help working class families in ohio where i am from, but also around the country to get thingings moving again. i ap
did the u.s. perg title it campus debit card trap? you guessed it. many are charged unreasonable fees that are costing them and the country millions of dollars. according to the report, 15 financial institutions have debit or prepaid card contracts with 878 campuses that serve more than nine million students. it's a big business. 42% of all students nationwide go to school on these 878 campuses. it's a lucrative business for financial institutions. there's a lot of money to be made from fees on college debit cards especially when you start charging fees on the billions of dollars disbursed each year in federal student aid. so the federal money is passing through these cards to the students, the financial institutions are making money in the process. as the u.s. perg report showed some of the fees are clearly unreasonable. one of the most egregious is a per-transaction fee on students for students for using a pin number instead of a signature. one of the largest campus debit card companies, hire one, currently charges students 50 cents every time the student enters his pin number at a
're lucky to have him with us. please join me in welcoming general keith alexander. [applause] [laughter] >> just hide behind the -- well, you know, part of the reason i don't like the publicity is my mother used to say i had a face made for radio. i'm sure you've all heard that before. [laughter] and another comment you could probably add to it is behind every successful army officer is a stunned father-in-law. we have that as well. um, there's a few things that i'd like to talk about today, and i know we're going to have of a small group of about 25-30 people to do that with. and i see that's grown slightly. i'm not a mathematician per se. there are some things that i do want to put on the table for us to discuss, and i know we're going to have a panel that will talk about what we talk about here later in more detail. first, what secretary wolfowitz brought out, i think s absolutely important for our nation. cyber legislation. i think it's important that we talk about this. now, i'm not here to talk about any specific piece of legislation, but i do think it's important that we as a nat
a little over an hour. is the a nonfiction author or okwuetse ses -mat booktv@c-span.org. were tweaked us at twitterom/booktv. >> several years ago and the queen was that one of her yearly garden parties makin y inee aelone guests, she was asking such standard questions as have you come for? when one woman lood at her and said, what do you-seeal l aen hdarthee described exchange and confess confessed that i had nidea what to say. it was the first time in all the years of meeting people that quonne had ever asked me that whhe but to tell what she's really like. to take the reader as close as possible to elizabeth the human being, the wife, mother an friend, as well the ghly wht liorite about the elizabeth, second, i would like to share with you some of the many surprising discoveries that i made about the queen. becae she is t best known pe fasw, t ereal woman is very different from the woman this is my fifth biography, all of them are about larger-than-life charactrs s arntd, t's ne h uen,ds ve hvro o world. other heads of state have come and gone. elizabeth is the longest-servi leader i
for bankruptcy. then, u.s. solicitor general donald verrilli. after that, live remarks by vice president biden on his assessment of the republican congressional budget and its impact on senior citizens. and later, the senate returns for work on a judicial nomination and a campaign finance bill known as the disclose act. .. >> good morning, everybody. and welcome to the joint convening of the energy and power subcommittee and the oversight investigation committee and i join my distinguished subcommittee chairman, mr. whitfield from kentucky, in convening this joint legislative hearing. we have two bills before the subcommittee. i will be addressing my opening statements to the no more solyndras act and then relinquishing the chair for the first panel to my colleague, mr. whitfield. and i yield myself four minutes for my opening statement. with chairman upton, i am a proud sponsor of the no more solyndra act. the act is the product of an 18-month investigation by the subcommittee on oversight and investigations. today marks a turning point in this investigation. we gather to consider a bill that
around and they looked look like us and they open their mouths and they say bar, r., bar. what are they? and of course one thing that happened was they began to be enslaved and in some cases coercively converted until victoria denounced it as a parable of crime. inasmuch as he is a person every indian has free will and consequently is the master of his actions come his dominion. every man has the right to his own life and physical and mental integrity. another great -- also associated is the forerunner of libertarian thinking, who devoted his life to defending the indians against this brutal, horrific enslavement. he has come to the americas as a young adventurer alleged to have seen christopher columbus sailed off to america when he was a boy. and imagine the excitement to go to this new world. what he saw there shocked him, and he was converted by a traveling priest, who explained what was happening here. the brutality, the exploitation, the cruelty visited on these people and he wrote a book called the devastation of the indians, a horrific re. he talks about human beings hunted from
of which have significantly advanced u.s. national security interests while also strengthening our national intelligence and military intelligence capabilities during a very challenging period in our nation's history. throughout his time in uniform, lieutenant general burgess has demonstrated an unyielding dedication to duty and innate ability to inspire enthusiasm and commitment to serve those he leads. lieutenant general burgess' selfless service to country and his unparalleled personal drive have been instrumental in transforming defense intelligence into a more capable and cooperative enterprise, providing the critical intelligence required by military commanders and policymakers both at the defense and national levels. commissioned as a second lieutenant through the auburn university rotc program in 1974, lieutenant general burgess began his career with a series of assignments in armor and military intelligence units in germany and at fort stewart, georgia, where he was directly responsible for planning multiple highly successful national training center rotations, numerous command pos
dozen to dozen times between when the u.s. supreme court agreed to hear the case and harvard law professor appeared in public in the classroom by saying th way of the indationwod h wobeth wee fel rn has on msnbc and other networks. he said it again and again and again. and of course, he is teacher that both thechief justice and president obama had when they re students law students at had. stn'c that the basis of the decision is entirely on prince. it is based n what the tngs said. i can realize people can disagree with it. and evidencely so. i think at i the ay se w may have happened leading up to the decision. i. >> just to correct the record. i certainl agree with chief justice roberts whenever he came to the conclusion genuinely believed, i findhitax nvng eriv he came to it as a matter of law, it isunfortunate that -- the question i was raisingis i he d co rve cos o the groundty, if they were the case, and there is at least some leaks that might be the case, is that an admirable move? u t neocens e ca. ane ot ifce to. >> i think that certainly the chief justice needs to be c
why this is a particularly exciting project for geeks like us. [laughter] you're not include inside that, jeremy. jeremy's the cool reporter person, the rest of us are the political science nerds up here. >> actually, at brookings we consider geek a positive word. [laughter] >> lynn was sort of talking about florida. listen, the fact of the matter is, this is -- it is phenomenally difficult to measure with precision what the effect of advertising is. and the person who bought george w. bush's ads in 2000 always used to say with a big smile on his face that it was the most efficient ad buy in history in florida. he didn't waste a single dollar on florida. now, obviously, with a big smile on his face and joking. what he meant was a little too close for comfort for the bush people, but if you're looking at it as a complete economic efficiency, they didn't waste any money in florida because they won by 530 votes, whatever it was. anything they would have spent more than that would be a waste. but they, obviously, don't think like that. they're obviously not trying to get efficiency in t
court. will tt,ha you t y mye p. i tanl he es is ba , pot us hng and we have some areas of disagreement, which i think we need to exore further, buwao k icly . ahiavor yoxcntk t s awornt and thank the chairman and substituting chairman for their tolerance and patience. i tnk y allll thai. 'sto >> you know, i think i need the ad -- i have a right to the rema st, d't >>, yodo >>ortei a poeno goto myst aheu'et gaanu'e ai aetry respect being called the chairman. thank you, senator blumenthal. everyone here has talked about thmpnc opio o w orntfi coitthsendt seems everyone agrees it racial profiling can undermine trust in the authorities and can cause resentment among targete groups nna om age la omamens in my opinion, no community was more upset when thhern t so-acaadne toomndconvolved with al shabaab. when i talked to both the fbi director muller and more importantly when i went back to the twinitieand lkedo eci a ge th bsahae li community had been cooperative in fbi investigations. and i think it was because of actually very good police work and
seen. i never saw any other case that resembled us in terms of the rule of law in the way it scrambled around priorities and the speed that they sold the company and distributed the assets. >> bubbled what role did the auto tax course administration play in the negotiations between the g8 and the uaw? >> i think the role that we played with the same that we played with most of the issues, which is to say that general motors, we defer to them in terms of their business judgment. about how to handle a particular matter, and i can see a negotiation would fall into that category. but we reviewed that decision to see if we agreed on that. >> do they have a fair amount of leverage? >> i think they had a fair amount. >> do think that they would've derailed the deal over the salaries of a few? >> i cannot speculate. >> i think our judgment at the time was correct. >> i think everyone in the case who had leverage exerted that leverage the uaw is no different than any other participant. >> do they think they would've derailed the negotiations? >> i truly don't know. >> but would you -- you would
of the things that he hears from his constituents is that they expect us to work together here in washington, in the senate, in congress to get things done for the people of this country. i hear that from my constituents. i'm sure the presiding officer hears that from her constituents. people throughout the country expect us to work together, and they want to see us address the economic challenges that we're facing in the country. well, one of the best ways to address the fiscal issues that we're facing is to be able to grow this economy, and nothing is more important to growing the economy, to creating jobs than small businesses. senator casey talked about the recent report that came out from his congressional committee, talking about the importance of small business. the fact is that over the last decade, businesses are fewer than 250 employees accounted for nearly 80% of all new hires. economists tell us that about two-thirds of the jobs that are going to be needed to get us out of this recession are going to come from small businesses, and in new hampshire, small businesses are particula
service to our capital city. when the new rail franchises are a portion in august, will he use his good office to ensure this government does everything possible to ensure this is connected to our capital city? >> my honorable friend always speaks up. he's right that wendy's franchises are looked at there are opportunities to make the case before investment and for more services, and i'm sure the operation and others will listen to what he said today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. my constituents is recovering from cancer but she has had -- the government consultation on changing this rule, when are we going to suggest is for the 7000 cancer patients in this situation? >> i've looked carefully at this case and i know she has not had a response from the minister about this issue. as she knows there are two types of eesa. one where there's permanent support, and is not means tested, and another weather is means testing after a year. what we're doing is making sure that more people with cancer are getting more help and more treatment and i think that is very important. and i think is absolute
and put behind us before any further damage is done to a woman, an american of genuine patriotism and love of country. mr. president, i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: mr. coats: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from in. mr. coats: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the call of the quorum be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: mr. president, i come to the floor today to comment on a couple of things. one, the dialogue that took place this morning before the majority leader and minority leader relative to how the senate should function -- two different views on this between the two, and they had quite an exchange. i don't know how many people tuned in. i tuned in this morning and then found myself pretty engaged in that. it all stemmed from the fact that the majority leader announced that he was not going to bring any of the appropriations bill to the floor for debate, consideration, amendment, or voting. i'm a member of that appropriations
on average from approximately $55,000 to $50,000. food stamp use, food stamp recipients have increased from 32 million recipients when this administration started in office to 46 million food stamp recipients today. home values have dropped on average from $169,000 to $148,000. the economic growth, economic growth in this recovery is the weakest of any recovery since world war ii. last quarter, our growth was 1.9% versus the prior quarter, 1.9%. job creation last month, 80,000 jobs, but it takes 150,000 jobs gaining every month just to hold even with our population growth, just to start reducing that 8.2% unemployment rate. so the facts, those are the facts. they speak for themselves. you can draw your own conclusion. the president's approach to our economy is making it worse. his fallure to join with us in extending the current tax rates and engage in pro-growth tax reform rather than raising taxes is sitting on our economy like a big, wet blanket. but we can change that. we can change that right now. we do it by extending the current tax rates, the tax rates that have been in effect for t
committee are ready to work on this important legislation as well. and they refuse to work with us to help the economy or to prevent a looming tax hike on nearly a million small businesses at the end of the year. instead, they prefer to waste valuable time on a vote they have argued for many years shouldn't take place this close to a presidential election. now that there is a democrat in the white house, they refuse to follow past practice of postponing the consideration of circuit court nominations this late in a presidential election year so the american people can decide who they want to make these important appointments. this practice is known as the leahy-thurmond rule. it's a custom they vigorously defended when there was a republican in the white house. so let's take a look at recent history. in 2004, the unemployment rate was only 5.4%. on our circuit courts, however, back in 2004, there were nine declared judicial emergencies. now, that didn't matter to our democratic colleagues. the senate stopped, stopped circuit court nominations in june of that year, even though we had nine ju
in general and this institution, the u.s. senate, should operate to get things done. we went through the amendatory process. you notice that the two leaders of the transportation and public works committee did -- they fought off all of the amendments that would have been killer amendments. they accepted some that they felt strengthened the bill, and we passed it something like high high0's70's to something in the teens. as a part of that bill, in the process several months ago when the transportation bill was on the senate floor, i had the privilege of offering an amendment -- again, bipartisan -- that was the amendment to restore the gulf of mexico after the effects of the b.p. oil spill. and it emanates from the fact that we have a fine that will be leviebe. mr. levin: i haved by a -- by -- and it d. mr. nelson: and it emanates from the fact that we have a fine that will be levied by a federal judge. the law allows for a certain amount for the judge to determine per barrel of oil spilled in the gulf of mexico. and the law in general allows for the amount to be levied against any ba
into what makes this nation so excellent. we know that it's you. father, a thank you for each one of use of -- thank you for each one of these and people. we thank you for the time and pray that continues throughout the day. please bless each one of our speakers as they come out and impart wisdom. we pray that you would bless each one of these young people at that lead today to go out and change the nation, to protect those values that make it so great, to reflect you. we pray that each one of these and people would not grow weary but they would mount up on the wings like eagles. but pinky for the state and ask you to bless it might lead in jesus' name. >> thank you. and we do appreciate the hospitality of the heritage foundation for some 200 students coming from about 100 different colleges. i hope you have found a very profitable and enjoyable. i'm going to call on a representative of the heritage foundation. director of the young eagles program. just take a minute or so about the heritage program. we do some great work -- they do some great work and we appreciate their cooperation. >>
registered voters than there are adults over the age of 18 according to the u.s. census. because of a clue. what to me to put this will, there's simple steps. have they photo id to present at the polls and clean up absentee balloting. absentee ballots of the to a choice because you can register, applied for a ballot, then, and in many cases never have to present himself. kansas has been very good form. often require the you have a legitimate excuse to ask for an absentee ballot. they should make an effort to vote on election day. the few votes to early you have people voting before the last debate stiffeners. in addition, when you apply you have to give them the last four digits of his social security number, and that has reduced from dramatically. we are told this is the other suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans supp
bound to do his share. i submit to you that most of us have not learned our share of freedom. most of us have not been on the battlefield. over 1 million of our ancestors died, beginning with the revolution and since then to preserve our freedoms. that's why i call our constitution are it, learned, or lose it. arnett, studying it and learning it will lose some. so what is freedom? i don't know how you define it. i can tell you that it has a lot to do with knowledge. thomas jefferson says freedom and ignorance cannot long survive together. just think about the impact of what that means. that means, if we do not maintain our knowledge of our government and constitution we will have tierney and our doors to. to enjoy freedom we must maintain our knowledge. justice said khalil would suggest to you that the main portion of the constitution, these first seven articles, destruction -- the structure, if you will, the government, the genius behind the framers that makes our government sometimes an official, but checks and balances power along the way. and don't let anybody ever tell you these men
advanced payment of bonuses that were due in 1945. president herbert hoover ordered the u.s. army to a defect the marchers from camp in washington, d.c. on july 28, 1932. this is about 45 minutes. >> so, i was going to talk a little bit about the impetus for the book, where the book came from, "my father's bonus march." with every book i've written, it always seems -- it seems almost to residential, but there's always just one small incident that starts off, and it's one small incident and it keeps mushrooming and mushrooming into a book. with my first two novels the washington story the journal of the novel if you will come began with just imaginary conversations of three people on the street corner in my old neighborhood, west rogers park, been trying to imagine who these people were on the street corner. imagine their lives, the family, the time period, and a thousand pages later into the first draft, i realized there was going to be a novel after all. with ellington boulevard it began with one simple moment coming home to an apartment that you thought was yours and finding a r
. this is something we have to do to make sure there isn't an attack against us and especially during an election year. i think it comes with this idea that there still is a military solution and let's recognize that a lot of people in this administration came from the last administration. there isn't that much of a transformation from the bush administration to the obama administration when it comes to the military and when it comes to the cia. in fact there's just been a little rearranging of the titles. so it's the same mindset and some of the same exact people and it's a reflection of an inability to have a military solution in afghanistan even with boots on the ground. some people say that this administration's way of dealing with the war is a whack-a-mole policies, they whack them in afghanistan and then they go to yemen and whack them there and now they are talking about having drones in africa. i think what is implied in your question is an somebody going to stop at some point and say this doesn't make any sense? on the other hand it keeps the military complex going and as long as americans co
. >> six u.s. presidents? >> six in contention in one way or another. as several people have sent. yes, i know that. but if he is not dead, he is the nominee and the president of the united states. he sends his secretary of state to the convention to stampede the convention. about idea. >> he wanted the nomination. and of course, harding, coolidge, hoover, wins two democratic primaries come fdr is on the ticket a device -- as a vice presidential candidate. you have this and so much else going on with the league of nations and every other thing. 1960, well, we move on from that to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six, but we have three of the biggest namebrand and presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, so very different. so different in terms of dynastic or just personal, and something which, i think resonates so much with the folks and reading books today. 1948, that is a great cliffhanger. we love to listen to the experts. we'd love to get the weather reports. and they are always wrong and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always
an administration which gets us into a war, fights a war, it may be successful, but the american people, any people will turn against it. 1920, wilson with the republicans, went into congress in '46. lyndon johnson not being able to succeed himself. and the bushes. it those a very hell of a good war leader, winston churchill. so there's a problem with that. but more than that, add one more gigantic thing it to, it's the economy, stupid, and the economy is a miss. more strikes than ever in american history. >> host: in 1920? >> guest: 1919. 1920. the boston police strike with calvin coolidge. the seattle general strike. you think the world is about ready to blow up after the war. and the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, are terrific. we would easily be satisfied with what's going on now rather than have that. >> host: in 1919-1920, was it a given or general thought that whoever won the republican primary would win the presidency? >> guest: yes, i think so. i mean, you have to be dreaming to think as the year went on that democrats could pull it off, and there is this massive, massive landslide
to better protect the us air and surface transportation from a possible terrorist attack. a former transportation department official, tom blanks, will testify alongwith a couple of counter terrorism experts. this hearing has been underway for about 10, 11 minutes. and we're hearing opening statements now. >> to continue to improve the system that secures our nation's skies. today we'll take a closer look at tsa's risk based approach and the effort. there have been many changes and they are looking forward to those changes the threat to inbound passenger and cargo flights remains reality. these threats can only be resolved if members of body are not afraid to ask difficult questions or embrace difficult answers and not take a widespread view we must throw out the transportation security administration. our witnesses will discuss various ideas of improving tsa risk based approach to secure the aviation sector. as authorizing committee for tsa it is appropriate for us to consider ideas for those who do not work for tsa i look for to hearing from police alonzo a flight attendant how t
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